Thursday, 22 August 2013

Brisbane Suburb -Steve Griffiths from Moorooka New City Plan


   Brisbane City Council's New City Plan


THIS ARTICLE EXPLAINS WHAT COULD HAPPEN WITH NEW LAWS, BUT IS NO GUARANTEE , LIKE ANY NEW LAWS THEY HAVE TO BE PASSED BEFORE YOU CAN CAPITALISE ON . IT IS A GREAT REPRESENTATION OF WHAT COULD HAPPEN AND HOW THE LOCAL COUNCIL IS CONSIDERING A CHANGE TO PLANS.


We live in a great part of Brisbane. Our fantastic local parks, terrific lifestyle and strong sense of community are part of what makes this area a wonderful place to live.

BUT if you want to maintain this great local lifestyle, there has never been a more important time for you to pay attention to proposed changes to Brisbane City Council’s City Plan.

Council is making town planning decisions now, which will impact on us ALL in the future.
So please take a moment to read this in full. By the time somebody is developing the land next to your house, it will be too late.

There are many of changes proposed in the New City Plan that I am concerned about. I wanted to share these concerns with you and I would be interested in your feedback on them. In particular I am concerned that:

1) Block sizes and frontages will be even smaller but houses can be bigger. 

 The draft New City Plan includes proposals to allow blocks of land to be smaller but houses can be bigger, taller and closer to neighbouring homes. In particular:

• The allowable height of houses will increase from 8.5 metres to 9.5 metres.

Currently most houses are less than 7 metres unless they have been raised. There will be no direct sunlight, few breezes and more noise from neighbours with this increased height.

Standard blocks (607 square metres/24 perch) in the Low Medium Density area where units are permitted can be as small as 180 square metres with a width of 7.5 metres. This means four times the number of units.

• The new Dual Occupancy provisions will allow two dwellings on one lot.
This means two dwellings on lots as small as 240square metres/8 perch – the size of a tennis court.

• Standard blocks (607 square metres/24 perch) in the Low Density areas will be able to be subdivided to two 300 square metre blocks with a 7.5 metre frontage.
This means a doubling of the number of houses in a suburb.

• The current Gross Floor Area (GFA) measurement, which encouraged wide balconies and shady spaces at street level with unit development, is being removed. This will lead to a bigger, bulkier style unit development which will have a more severe impact on the streetscape.

2) Residents will lose their say in the development approval process:
• Currently many developments must undergo a period of public notification (impact assessable) where a white sign goes up in the front of the property inviting submissions from neighbours.

• The draft new City Plan significantly reduces the number of development types that need this type of consultation and changed them instead to ‘code assessable’.

• In particular the need for public notification of development is being removed for units, new duplexes and demolition of character houses.

This means under the draft new City Plan, a resident’s right to know and comment on proposed development next door is being taken away and many people won’t realise neighbours are planning to develop their property until the bulldozers start work.

3) No fix for lack of car parking solutions – meaning parking problems in our local streets will get worse:
• As you know many local suburban streets in Brisbane are already ‘parked out’ as a result of overdevelopment and lack of appropriate parking solutions, particularly near public transport hubs and unit complexes.

• The draft new City Plan does nothing to address car parking issues in our City.

• Developers should be required to provide more onsite car parks (an increase in the parking ratio) in unit developments so visitors and households with more than one car aren’t forced to park on the street.
• Under the draft new City Plan, car parking in suburban streets will get worse, not better.

4) Development in Flood Prone Areas:
• Unit buildings will be permitted on flood plains where the “flooding is expected with fast following water”. The onus is on the builder to make sure the building is flood proof.


Please copy me into any submission you make to Council so I can represent your views in Council as part of the Council debate on the new City Plan. My email is: moorooka.ward@ecn.net.au
If you write a submission to Council on the new City Plan, please ensure you include your signature, name and address for it to be valid.
Want more information?
If you would like to find out more and ask your own questions about the City Plan Changes attend one of the following Talk to a Planner Sessions

reposted from :http://www.stevegriffithsmoorooka.com